Dark Matter

Dark matterDark Matter, by Blake Crouch, is a mind-boggling foray into the world of Multi-Verses.  This novel is exciting and terrifying by turns,  and it gives rise to questions of our universe. Jason Dessen is a college professor of physics in Chicago, and  husband to the beautiful artist, Daniela and a father to their son, Charlie. His life is picture perfect and he’s happy, except there are the times when he wonders what turn his life would have taken if he’d stayed with his research instead of marrying and having a child.  One night he goes to meet a colleague who has won a great scientific prize, the one he should have won.  That’s when improbablity meets probability.

This novel is based on the idea that our lives are a matter of random choices with equally random outcomes, but with far reaching consquences. What if we’d taken another path, instead of the one we are on?  What if another version of Jason Dessen, the one who didn’t marry, who did the research that enabled him to change his destiny,decided he wanted the other Jason’s life?

This fictional account is well written and researched. It poses many questions about our universe. It’s a great read!

 

8 thoughts on “Dark Matter

  1. While this tale sounds intriguing, I don’t need to read it since I live it. However, I’ve never played the ‘what if’ game as often, or to the extent, as I have in the last few months. What a wonderful storyline for a novel……….or for real life. I know that you understand, dear Author.

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    • Yes, it’s a fascinating concept, one I’m sure many of us scratch our collective heads over. The big, ‘what if?’ scenario. There are times and places when we can alter our paths, but often time runs out or moral and ethical issues prevent us from changing the outcomes of our choices. I guess that’s when we need to make the best of things to the best of our abilities. Still, there is joy to be had in the little things. :o)

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  2. As I’ve come to expect, your insight is both accurate and meaningful, dear Author, as there is great joy to he had in the little things. The babbling of a brook (not my daughter, since that Brooke does a different type of babbling), an ocean breeze, the sky at sunrise or sunset, the smell of a pine forest, the smile of a baby or the raucous laughter of a young boy flying down a hallway in a wheelchair. Along with all of its trials and what ifs, life offers many pleasures. What if I had only chosen to go to college at FSU?

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  4. I am currently reading this book. It’s interesting if we could experience how our life would be in different paths. The sad thing about having one life to live is doing the one thing we set out to do. Go to school, obtain a career, and keep at it. I usually admire those who worked in one field for 40 years, but now reading this book, I wonder if that is a wise choice to be stuck in one path that long. What is your personal view on it?

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    • Hi Jasmine, well, I’m one of those who stayed on the same path for my entire teaching career, but I get your question. Sometimes I wish I’d tried another path, in retrospect. Yet, I loved teaching and I guess my final analysis is, find something you love and do it for only as long as it fills your soul. :o)

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      • I, too, followed the same career path for my entire working life. And I, too, often wished that I’d followed another path, however I never knew what that path should have been so maybe I was, by default, on the right path the whole time. I also find it a bit strange that some people will continue on a chosen path and then a new, exciting and promising path provides a fork (or maybe two spoons) in that road only to have the traveler choose to renew the old and worn, yet familiar path, as though the old had expired and could be revitalized by a renewal. We are creatures of habit, are we not?

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